Database Journal
MS SQL Oracle DB2 Access MySQL PostgreSQL Sybase PHP SQL Etc SQL Scripts & Samples Links Database Forum

» Database Journal Home
» Database Articles
» Database Tutorials
MS SQL
Oracle
DB2
MS Access
MySQL
» RESOURCES
Database Tools
SQL Scripts & Samples
Links
» Database Forum
» Sitemap
Free Newsletters:
DatabaseDaily  
News Via RSS Feed


follow us on Twitter
Database Journal |DBA Support |SQLCourse |SQLCourse2
 

Featured Database Articles

MS SQL

Posted Jan 2, 2007

Logical Functions: IsSibling(): Conditional Logic within Filter Expressions - Page 4

By William Pearson

Let’s finalize our efforts by placing the logic within a Named Set. Creating the Named Set within Analysis Services will allow for easy reuse of a predefined sibling Sales Employees group in Reporting Services, as well as other client applications, where we might, for example, define a row in a report through the use of a single object.

22.  Replace the top line of the query (commented out) with the following:

-- MDX051-002-3  Reusable Named Set using Filter() / IsSibling() Combination

23.  Select File -> Save MDX051-002-2.mdx As ..., name the file MDX051-002-3, and place it with the queries saved earlier.

24.  Place the cursor to the immediate right of the statement inserted above (in the top row).

25.  Press the ENTER key four times to “push down” the rest of the line, and to add space between the comment line and the SELECT keyword.

26.  Insert the following into the space between the comment line and the SELECT keyword:


WITH
SET
   [SALES OPERATIVES] 
 
AS
   'FILTER(
   
      [Employee].[Employee Department].MEMBERS,
   
         ISSIBLING([Employee].[Employee Department].CURRENTMEMBER,
   
      [Employee].[Employee Department].[Sales Representative].[Jae B. Pak]))'

Here we have simply defined a Named Set containing the logic that we used within our row axis definition in the previous example.

27.  Replace the following four lines within the Select statement (currently lines 13, 14, 15, and 16):


FILTER(
         [Employee].[Employee Department].MEMBERS,
      ISSIBLING([Employee].[Employee Department].CURRENTMEMBER,
   [Employee].[Employee Department].[Sales Representative].[Jae B. Pak]))

with the following:

[SALES OPERATIVES]

The complete query is as follows, if cutting and pasting is the preference:


-- MDX051-002-3  Reusable Named Set using Filter() / IsSibling() Combination
WITH
SET
   [SALES OPERATIVES] 
 
AS
   'FILTER(
   
      [Employee].[Employee Department].MEMBERS,
   
         ISSIBLING([Employee].[Employee Department].CURRENTMEMBER,
   
      [Employee].[Employee Department].[Sales Representative].[Jae B. Pak]))'
         
SELECT
   {[Measures].[Reseller Sales Amount]} ON AXIS(0),
              
   NONEMPTY( {
   
    [SALES OPERATIVES]
   
   })ON AXIS(1)
      
FROM
 
   [Adventure Works]
WHERE 
   [Date].[Calendar].[Calendar Year].[CY 2004]

The Query pane appears, with our input, as depicted in Illustration 12.


Illustration 12: Our Modified Query in the Query Pane ...

28.  Execute the query by clicking the Execute button in the toolbar.

The Results pane is populated by Analysis Services. This time, the dataset shown in Illustration 13 appears.


Illustration 13: Results Dataset Sibling Employee Members via Named Set

In the returned dataset, we see the same filtered list of employees. This serves to illustrate how we might meet the business need with a Named Set, which, once created within the cube involved, would support easy, consistent reporting via a single object for row / column definitions, and the like.

29.  Select File -> Save MDX049-002-3 to save the file.

The client representatives confirm that their immediate goals have been met, and that the illustrations we have provided can be easily extended to local business scenarios where filtering for sibling members is useful in meeting reporting and analysis requirements.

30.  Select File -> Exit to leave the SQL Server Management Studio, when ready.

Summary ...

In this article, we extended our examination of the IsSibling() function, exploring its use, once again, as a conditional logic modifier - but this time within the context of a filter, through its combination with the MDX Filter() function. We stated that, along with the IIF() function, this is another commonly employed approach for using IsSibling() within the business environment.

We next reviewed the general syntax involved in using IsSibling(). Finally, we undertook illustrative examples whereby we put the IsSibling() function to work, in combination with the Filter() function, initially within a simple illustration to illustrate its general operation. We followed our initial practice example with another, where we began by employing the IsSibling() / Filter() combination within a direct row-axis definition, before placing the combination within a Named Set, to meet a hypothetical business need. Throughout our practice session, we briefly discussed the results datasets we obtained from each of the queries we constructed.

» See All Articles by Columnist William E. Pearson, III

Discuss this article in the MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services and MDX Topics Forum.



MS SQL Archives

Comment and Contribute

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have characters left.

 

 




Latest Forum Threads
MS SQL Forum
Topic By Replies Updated
SQL 2005: SSIS: Error using SQL Server credentials poverty 3 August 17th, 07:43 AM
Need help changing table contents nkawtg 1 August 17th, 03:02 AM
SQL Server Memory confifuration bhosalenarayan 2 August 14th, 05:33 AM
SQL Server Primary Key and a Unique Key katty.jonh 2 July 25th, 10:36 AM