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MS SQL

Posted Oct 29, 2008

Introducing Reporting Services Charts for Analysis Services - Page 2

By William Pearson

Chart Type: Column

Variants

The Column chart type offers the following variants:

  • Simple Column
  • Stacked Column
  • 100% Stacked Column

Summary of Typical Use

Column charts are typically used to compare values between categories.

Description

The Column chart type in Reporting Services presents values and series groups as sets of vertical columns that are grouped by category. Values are represented by the height of the columns (as measured by the y-axis). Category labels are displayed on the x-axis.

Chart Type: Bar

Variants

The Bar chart type offers the following variants:

  • Simple Bar
  • Stacked Bar
  • 100% Stacked Bar

Summary of Typical Use

Bar charts are typically used to compare values between categories.

Description

The Bar chart type in Reporting Services presents series as sets of horizontal bars that are grouped by category. Values are represented by the length of the bars as measured by the x-axis. Category labels are displayed on the y-axis.

Chart Type: Area

Variants

The Area chart type offers the following variants:

  • Simple Area
  • Stacked Area
  • 100% Stacked Area

Summary of Typical Use

Area charts are typically used to compare values over time.

Description

The Area chart type in Reporting Services presents series as a set of points connected by a line, with an area filled in below the line. Values are represented by the height of the point as measured by the y-axis. Category labels are displayed on the x-axis.

Chart Type: Line

Variants

The Line chart type offers the following variants:

  • Simple Line
  • Smooth Line

Summary of Typical Use

Line charts are typically used to compare values over time.

Description

The Line chart type in Reporting Services presents series as a set of points connected by a line. Values are represented by the height of the point as measured by the y-axis. Category labels are displayed on the x-axis.

Chart Type: Pie

Variants

The Pie chart type offers the following variants:

  • Simple Pie
  • Exploded Pie

Summary of Typical Use

Pie charts are typically used to present percentages (as in “percent composition of a whole,” etc.).

Description

The Pie chart type in Reporting Services presents value data as percentages of the whole. Categories are represented by individual slices. The size of the slice is determined by the value.

Chart Type: Doughnut

Variants

The Doughnut chart type offers the following variants:

  • Simple Doughnut
  • Exploded Doughnut

Summary of Typical Use

Doughnut charts are functionally identical to Pie charts (except for the “hole in the center”), in that they are typically used to present percentages (as in “percent composition of a whole,” etc.).

Description

The Doughnut chart type in Reporting Services presents value data as percentages of the whole. Categories are represented by individual slices. The “hole in the center” of the Doughnut chart type allows for more contrast in differentiating “slices,” as its three - dimensional rendering, which gives “slices” four sides (rather than the three afforded in the Pie chart). The Doughnut chart therefore presents smaller slices more clearly, in many cases.

Chart Type: Scatter (“XY”)

Variants

The Scatter (“XY”) chart type offers the following variants:

  • Simple Scatter
  • Scatter / Lines
  • Scatter / Smooth Lines

Summary of Typical Use

Scatter (“XY”) charts are typically used to compare distinct values across categories.

Description

The Scatter (“XY”) chart type in Reporting Services presents series as a set of points. Values are represented by the position of the point in the chart space. Categories are represented by different points in the chart.

Chart Type: Bubble

Variants

The Bubble chart type offers the single Bubble selection option.

Summary of Typical Use

Bubble charts are typically used to compare distinct values across categories.

Description

The Bubble chart type in Reporting Services presents series as a set of symbols. Values are represented by the position of the point in the chart space and the size of the symbol. Categories are represented by different symbols in the chart.

Chart Type: Stock

Variants

The Stock chart type offers the following variants:

  • High-Low-Close
  • Open-High-Low-Close
  • Candlestick

Summary of Typical Use

Stock charts are typically used to present values of stocks at various critical points within a time frame (e.g., a trading period).

Description

The Stock chart type in Reporting Services presents series as a set of lines with markers for high, low, close, and open values. Values are represented by the height of the marker as measured by the y-axis. Category labels are displayed on the x-axis.

As we can see from the information above, Reporting Services offers a wide range of options for chart selection to assist us in the delivery of information within the business environment. We will extend our examination of chart types, specifically examining each type, together with the properties and methods we can manipulate for the precise presentations we seek to be able to deliver, in other articles of this series.

11.  Select File -> Exit to leave the design environment, when ready (saving as desired), and to close the Business Intelligence Development Studio.

Conclusion

In this, the “lead” article introducing chart data regions (particularly from the perspective of their uses with Analysis Services data sources), we introduced the various chart data regions that are available to us within Reporting Services, discussing the general uses and characteristics of each. Our intent, we noted, was to prepare ourselves for subsequent articles where we employ individual chart types in reporting from an Analysis Services data source, and demonstrate properties (and creative ways to manipulate them within our reports) and methods that we can employ to format and deliver information to meet the business needs of our clients and employees.

In introducing the basic chart types, we first returned to the sample Report Server project we have accessed for our hands-on sessions in other articles, AdventureWorks Sample Reports, and ascertained connectivity of its shared Analysis Services data source. We then created a clone of an existing sample Analysis Services report, containing a matrix data region, with which to perform our practice exercise. After enlarging the canvas upon which the matrix rested within the Layout tab of the Report Designer, to provide a place to drop a chart item from the Toolbox for purposes of our overview, we examined chart types from the standpoint of the existing report, noting how we add them to an open report in the Layout tab. Finally, we performed a brief overview of each chart type, discussing its strengths and typical uses, in preparation for articles focused upon individual chart types to appear in our MSSQL Server Reporting Services series.

About the MSSQL Server Reporting Services Series ...

This article is a member of the series MSSQL Server Reporting Services. The column is designed to introduce MSSQL Server Reporting Services (“Reporting Services”), presenting an overview of its features, with tips and techniques for real-world use. For more information on the series in general, please see my initial Database Journal article, A New Paradigm for Enterprise Reporting. For the software components, samples and tools needed to complete the hands-on portion of this article, see BlackBelt Administration: Linked Reports in Report Manager, another article within this series.

» See All Articles by Columnist William E. Pearson, III

Discuss this article in the MSSQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Forum.



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