Mastering Enterprise BI: Introduction to Translations - Page 6

September 11, 2006

Procedure

Define Translations within the Cube

Create a Cube Translation

Let's first create a Cube Translation within our new cube, to get some experience with the process. As we shall see, we create and manage Cube Translations on the Translations tab of the Cube Designer. For purposes of our practice session, we will say that we have been asked by the Adventure Works organization to add the capability for Spanish-speaking consumers, which comprise a growing proportion of worldwide employees within the organization, to be able to work with the same cube that we use in operational analysis in the United States.

1. Click the Translations tab atop the Cube Designer, as depicted in Illustration 43.


Illustration 43: Click the Translations Tab ...

The Translations page appears. Here, we see a list of the Cube Objects (similar to the list that we saw on the Perspectives tab in Mastering Enterprise BI: Introduction to Perspectives), grouped by object type, and subgrouped by parent structures, for which we can define Translations. We will say, for purposes of our practice session, that we are creating a Spanish Translation for Adventure Works users in Spain.

2. Right-click the "blank" space to the right of the objects list.

3. Select New Translation from the context menu that appears, as shown in Illustration 44.


Illustration 44: Creating a New Translation

The Select Language dialog box appears.

4. Scroll down to the Spanish (Spain) entry in the list underneath the title "Select a language for the new translation".

5. Click the Spanish (Spain) entry, to select it, as depicted in Illustration 45.


Illustration 45: Creating a New Translation

6. Click OK, to select the entry and to close the dialog.

We see a new column, labeled Spanish (Spain), appear on the right of the grid on the Translations tab, as shown in Illustration 46.


Illustration 46: The New Translation Appears in the (Partially Shown) Grid ...

In this column, we define the captions by typing in the local phrases as appropriate. Note that we can supply Spanish words here for the Cube, Measure Groups, Measures and Dimensions. Because we would need to supply a large number of phrases in the Translation language to completely localize our metadata, we will move to our next section at this point. In our business environments, this process might be most accurately and efficiently undertaken by a native speaking employee or contractor.

Let's take a look at the steps involved in adding Dimension Translations in the next section.

Create a Dimension Translation

As we mentioned in our introductory section, Analysis Services also supports Dimension Translations, which include representations of dimension and member names. We noted that a Dimension Translation is a language-specific representation of the name of a dimension object or of its members / attributes, such as a caption, member name, or hierarchy level. In effect, we are applying Translations to data, just as we did to the structure (or metadata) with Cube Translations earlier.

Let's take a look at the steps involved in adding Dimension Translations.

1. Right-click the Customer dimension in the Solution Explorer.

2. Select Open from the context menu that appears, as depicted in Illustration 47.


Illustration 47: Opening the Dimension Designer for the Customer Dimension ...

The Dimension Designer opens for the Customer dimension, where we will be working with the Translations tab, just as we did within the Cube Designer for Cube Translations in the previous section.

3. Click the Translations tab atop the Dimension Designer, as shown in Illustration 48.


Illustration 48: Click the Translations Tab ...

The Translations page for the Dimension Designer appears.

Here, we see a list of the Dimension Attributes and Hierarchies for the Customer dimension of the sample cube, as depicted in Illustration 49.


Illustration 49: Customer Dimension - Translations Tab of the Dimension Designer

Here we see the Dimension, its Attributes and Hierarchies, grouped by object type, and subgrouped by parent structures, for which we can define Translations. Let's say, once again for purposes of our practice session, that we are creating a Spanish Translation for Adventure Works users in Spain.

4. Right-click the "blank" space to the right of the objects list on the Translations tab.

5. Select New Translation from the context menu that appears, as shown in Illustration 50.


Illustration 50: Creating a New Translation

The Select Language dialog box appears, just as it did in our efforts with Cube Translations earlier.

6.  Scroll down to the Spanish (Spain) entry in the list underneath the title "Select a language for the new translation".

7.  Click the Spanish (Spain) entry, to select it, as depicted in Illustration 51.


Illustration 51: Creating a New Translation

8.  Click OK, to select the entry and to close the dialog.

We see a new column, labeled Spanish (Spain), appear on the right edge of the grid on the Translations tab, again in a similar manner to that which we observed on the Translations tab within the Cube Designer earlier, as shown in Illustration 52.


Illustration 52: The New Translation Appears in the (Partially Shown) Grid ...

In this column, we define the captions by typing in the local phrases as appropriate, just as we would do for Cube Translations within the Cube Designer. Also similar to the corresponding steps for adding Cube Translations, we might consider delegating the task of assigning the potentially large number of phrases required in the Translation language to a native speaking employee or contractor.

Depending upon the number of languages represented by users of our organization's information consumer audience, we might assign multiple Cube and Dimension Translations in a similar manner to that we have examined.








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