More Exposure to Settings and Properties in Analysis Services Attribute Relationships - Page 5

February 13, 2009

Define Attribute Relationships for Attributes in the Calendar Time Hierarchy

We will next work with attribute relationships within the Calendar Time hierarchy of the Time dimension. Because we are already within the Time dimension, we can get directly to work. There are five levels in the Calendar Time user hierarchy, as depicted, once again in Illustration 16.

Hierarchies and Levels Pane, Time Dimension
Illustration 16: Hierarchies and Levels Pane, Time Dimension

1.  Collapse the attributes we expanded in the last section (those relating to the Fiscal Time hierarchy)

2.  In the Attributes pane, expand the following attributes:

  • Calendar Quarter
  • Calendar Semester
  • Date
  • Month Name

Once these attributes are expanded, we see four attribute relationships remaining within the Date attribute no attribute relationships established within the Calendar Quarter and Calendar Semester attributes, and one attribute relationships established within the Month Name attribute, as shown in Illustration 17.

Attribute Relationships Established in the Time Dimension – Calendar Hierarchy
Illustration 17: Attribute Relationships Established in the Time Dimension – Calendar Hierarchy

3.  Drag the Calendar Quarter attribute relationship from the Date attribute to the <new attribute relationship> placeholder for the Month Name attribute.

4.  Within the Properties window, set the value for the RelationshipType property for the relocated Calendar Quarter attribute relationship to Rigid.

5.  Drag the Calendar Semester attribute relationship from the Date attribute to the <new attribute relationship> placeholder for the Calendar Quarter attribute.

6.  Within the Properties window, set the value for the RelationshipType property for the relocated Calendar Semester attribute relationship to Rigid.

7.  Drag the Calendar Year attribute relationship from the Date attribute to the <new attribute relationship> placeholder for the Calendar Semester attribute.

8.  Within the Properties window, set the value for the RelationshipType property for the relocated Calendar Year attribute relationship to Rigid.

Once we have made our modifications, the attribute relationships established appear as depicted in Illustration 18.

Attribute Relationships after Our Modifications
Illustration 18: Attribute Relationships after Our Modifications

Calendar Quarter is now related to Month Name, Calendar Semester is now related to Calendar Quarter, and Calendar Year is now related to Calendar Semester. The Rigid RelationshipType property is appropriate for these attribute relationships, because, once again, they will not change over time.

Finally, we will move to the Geography hierarchy, where we will a final set of attribute relationships.

Define Attribute Relationships for Attributes in the Geography Hierarchy

We will conclude our practice with attribute relationships within the Geography hierarchy of the Geography dimension.

1.  Within the Solution Explorer, right-click the Geography dimension.

2.  Click Open on the context menu that appears, once again.

The tabs of the Dimension Designer open.

3.  Click the Dimension Structure tab, if we have not already arrived there by default.

The attributes belonging to the Geography dimension appear as shown in Illustration 19.

The Member Attributes, Geography Dimension
Illustration 19: The Member Attributes, Geography Dimension

We note that five attributes appear within the Attributes pane. We will gain further exposure to attribute relationships, by adding / examining representative relationships among the attributes we see here.

We can also see, within the Hierarchies and Levels pane, four levels in the Geography user hierarchy. This hierarchy exists, like the others we have examined in this practice session, as a drill down path for information consumers, and appears as depicted in Illustration 20.

Hierarchies and Levels Pane, Geography Dimension
Illustration 20: Hierarchies and Levels Pane, Geography Dimension

4.  In the Attributes pane, expand the following attributes:

  • City
  • Geography Key
  • Postal Code
  • State-Province

Once these attributes are expanded, we see four attribute relationships currently established within the Geography Key attribute, with no attribute relationships established within the City, Postal Code and State Province attributes, as shown in Illustration 21.

Attribute Relationships Established in the Geography Dimension
Illustration 21: Attribute Relationships Established in the Geography Dimension

5.  Drag the City attribute relationship from the Geography Key attribute to the <new attribute relationship> placeholder for the Postal Code attribute.

Because postal codes within a city have been known to change over time, the appropriate value for the RelationshipType property for the City attribute relationship is Flexible, which is the default setting that we can see in the associated Properties window.

6.  Drag the State-Province attribute relationship from the Geography Key attribute to the <new attribute relationship> placeholder for the City attribute.

7.  Within the Properties window, set the value for the RelationshipType property for the relocated State-Province attribute relationship to Rigid.

The Rigid RelationshipType property is appropriate for the State-Province attribute relationship because the relationship between a given city and the state within which it is physically located will not change – at least not in a foreseeable way.

8.  Drag the Country-Region attribute relationship from the Geography Key attribute to the <new attribute relationship> placeholder for the State-Province attribute.

9.  Within the Properties window, set the value for the RelationshipType property for the relocated Country-Region attribute relationship to Rigid.

The Rigid RelationshipType property is appropriate for the Country-Region attribute relationship because the relationship between a given state and the country within which it is physically located will not change – again, at least not in a foreseeable way.

Once we have made our modifications, the attribute relationships established within the Geography dimension appear as depicted in Illustration 22.

Attribute Relationships after Our Modifications
Illustration 22: Attribute Relationships after Our Modifications

Postal Code remains related to Geography Key, City is now related to Postal Code, State-Province is now related to City, and Country-Region is now related to State-Province. We have established the RelationshipType property as Rigid for all except Postal Code and City, among these attribute relationships, as well.

This will conclude our work with attribute relationships. We encounter these important relationships within other articles of my Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services column, where we make both typical and special settings to meet specific business needs within the context of the focus of each article.

NOTE: Please consider saving the project we have created to this point for use in subsequent related articles of this subseries, so as to avoid the need to repeat the preparation process we have undertaken initially, to provide a practice environment.

10.  Select File -> Save All to save our work, up to this point, within the originally chosen location, where it can be easily accessed for our activities within other articles of this subseries.

11.  Click Yes when prompted, via the Visual Studio message box that appears next, to reprocess the affected cube objects.

12.  Click Run on the Process Object(s) dialog box that appears next, as appropriate.

Processing begins, and we see completion of the various steps via the Process Progress viewer. We see a “Process Succeeded” message in the Status bar at the bottom of the viewer, once processing is complete.

13.  Click Close to dismiss the Process Progress viewer.

14.  Click Close to dismiss the Process Object(s) dialog box.

15.  Select File -> Exit to leave the design environment, when ready, and to close the Business Intelligence Development Studio.

Conclusion

In this article, we continued our exploration of attribute relationships, stating that our objective would be to complement the introduction we undertook in Introduction to Attribute Relationships in MSSQL Server Analysis Services and the practice session we began in Attribute Relationships: Settings and Properties, through a continued detailed examination of attribute relationships. Our concentration upon these details was enhanced by our continuing hands-on practice session, where we once again gained exposure to the properties and settings that underlie attribute relationships.

Our examination included a review of the nature of the attribute relationship in Analysis Services, and its possible roles in helping to meet the primary objectives of business intelligence, based upon and extending the discussion we initiated in Introduction to Attribute Relationships in MSSQL Server Analysis Services, and continued in Attribute Relationships: Settings and Properties. We performed more detailed examination of the properties underlying attribute relationships, along with a review of the respective settings associated with each property, based upon additional representative dimension attributes within our sample UDM, as a part of our practice session. Throughout our practice procedures we obtained hands-on exposure to creating and modifying attribute relationships within several representative dimensions within our sample UDM.

About the MSSQL Server Analysis Services Series

This article is a member of the series Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services. The series is designed to provide hands-on application of the fundamentals of MS SQL Server Analysis Services (“Analysis Services”), with each installment progressively presenting features and techniques designed to meet specific real-world needs. For more information on the series, please see my initial article, Creating Our First Cube. For the software components, samples and tools needed to complete the hands-on portions of this article, see Usage-Based Optimization in Analysis Services 2005, another article within this series.

» See All Articles by Columnist William E. Pearson, III

Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services Series
Introduction to Security in Analysis Services
Cube Storage: Planning Partitions from a SQL Server Management Studio Perspective
Cube Storage: Planning Partitions (Business Intelligence Development Studio Perspective)
Cube Storage: Introduction to Partitions
Introduction to Cube Storage
Attribute Discretization: Customize Grouping Names
Attribute Discretization: Using the "Clusters" Method
Attribute Discretization: Using the "Equal Areas" Method
Attribute Discretization: Using the Automatic Method
Introduction to Attribute Discretization
More Exposure to Settings and Properties in Analysis Services Attribute Relationships
Attribute Relationships: Settings and Properties
Introduction to Attribute Relationships in MSSQL Server Analysis Services
Attribute Member Values in Analysis Services
MSSQL Analysis Services - Attribute Member Names
Attribute Member Keys - Pt II: Composite Keys
Attribute Member Keys - Pt 1: Introduction and Simple Keys
Dimension Attributes: Introduction and Overview, Part V
Dimension Attributes: Introduction and Overview, Part IV
Dimension Attributes: Introduction and Overview, Part III
Dimension Attributes: Introduction and Overview, Part II
Dimension Attributes: Introduction and Overview, Part I
Dimensional Model Components: Dimensions Part II
Dimensional Model Components: Dimensions Part I
Manage Unknown Members in Analysis Services 2005, Part II
Manage Unknown Members in Analysis Services 2005, Part I
Alternatively Sorting Attribute Members in Analysis Services 2005
Introduction to Linked Objects in Analysis Services 2005
Distinct Counts in Analysis Services 2005
Positing the Intelligence: Conditional Formatting in the Analysis Services Layer
Administration and Optimization: SQL Server Profiler for Analysis Services Queries
Mastering Enterprise BI: Time Intelligence Pt. II
Mastering Enterprise BI: Time Intelligence Pt. I
Design and Documentation: Introducing the Visio 2007 PivotDiagram
Actions in Analysis Services 2005: The URL Action
Actions in Analysis Services 2005: The Drillthrough Action
Mastering Enterprise BI: Introducing Actions in Analysis Services 2005
Mastering Enterprise BI: Introduction to Translations
Mastering Enterprise BI: Introduction to Perspectives
Introduction to the Analysis Services 2005 Query Log
Mastering Enterprise BI: Working with Measure Groups
Mastering Enterprise BI: Introduction to Key Performance Indicators
Mastering Enterprise BI: Extend the Data Source with Named Calculations, Pt. II
Mastering Enterprise BI: Extend the Data Source with Named Calculations, Pt. I
Process Analysis Services Objects with Integration Services
Usage-Based Optimization in Analysis Services 2005
Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services: Named Sets Revisited
Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services: Migrating an Analysis Services 2000 Database to Analysis Services 2005
Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services: Introducing Data Source Views
Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services: Reporting Options for Analysis Services Cubes: MS Excel 2003 and More ...
Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services: Mastering Enterprise BI: Create Aging "Buckets" in a Cube
Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services: Mastering Enterprise BI: Relative Time Periods in an Analysis Services Cube, Part II
Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services: Mastering Enterprise BI: Relative Time Periods in an Analysis Services Cube
Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services: Process Analysis Services Cubes with DTS
Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services: Presentation Nuances: CrossTab View - Same Dimension
Introduction to MSSQL Server Analysis Services: Point-and-Click Cube Schema Simplification
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Manage Distinct Count with a Virtual Cube
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Distinct Count Basics: Two Perspectives
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Semi-Additive Measures and Periodic Balances
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Performing Incremental Cube Updates - An Introduction
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Partitioning a Cube in Analysis Services - An Introduction
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Basic Storage Design
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Derived Measures vs. Calculated Measures
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Creating a Dynamic Default Member
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Another Approach to Local Cube Design and Creation
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Introduction to Local Cubes
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Actions in Virtual Cubes
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Putting Actions to Work in Regular Cubes
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Reporting Options for Analysis Services Cubes: ProClarity Part II
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Reporting Options for Analysis Services Cubes: ProClarity Professional, Part I
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Using Calculated Cells in Analysis Services , Part II
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Using Calculated Cells in Analysis Services, Part I
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: MSAS Administration and Optimization: Toward More Sophisticated Analysis
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: MSAS Administration and Optimization: Simple Cube Usage Analysis
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Build a Web Site Traffic Analysis Cube: Part II
Build a Web Site Traffic Analysis Cube: Part I
Reporting Options for Analysis Services Cubes: Cognos PowerPlay
Reporting Options for Analysis Services Cubes: MS FrontPage 2002
Reporting Options for Analysis Services Cubes: MS Excel 2002
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Drilling Through to Details: From Two Perspectives
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Custom Cubes: Financial Reporting - Part II
Introduction to MSSQL Server 2000 Analysis Services Custom Cubes: Financial Reporting (Part I)
Introduction to SQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Exploring Virtual Cubes
Introduction to SQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Working with the Cube Editor
Introduction to SQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Parent-Child Dimensions
Introduction to SQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Handling Time Dimensions
Introduction to SQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Working with Dimensions
Introduction to SQL Server 2000 Analysis Services: Creating Our First Cube








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