Database Journal
MS SQL Oracle DB2 Access MySQL PostgreSQL Sybase PHP SQL Etc SQL Scripts & Samples Links Database Forum

» Database Journal Home
» Database Articles
» Database Tutorials
MS SQL
Oracle
DB2
MS Access
MySQL
» RESOURCES
Database Tools
SQL Scripts & Samples
Links
» Database Forum
» Sitemap
Free Newsletters:
DatabaseDaily  
News Via RSS Feed


follow us on Twitter
Database Journal |DBA Support |SQLCourse |SQLCourse2
 

Featured Database Articles

MS SQL

Posted Dec 18, 2000

SQL Server 2000: Some Useful Trace Flags

By Alexander Chigrik


Introduction
Trace flags
Literature

Introduction

In this article, I want to tell you, what you should know about trace flags, and how you can use some useful trace flags in SQL Server 2000 for administering and monitoring.

Trace flags are used to temporarily set specific server characteristics or to switch off a particular behavior. You can set trace flags with DBCC TRACEON command or with the -T option with the sqlservr command- line executable. After activated, trace flag will be in effect until you restart server, or until you deactivate trace flag with DBCC TRACEOFF command.


Trace flags

You can use DBCC TRACESTATUS command to get the status information for a particular trace flag(s) currently turned on. This is the syntax from SQL Server Books Online:

DBCC TRACESTATUS (trace# [,...n])

To get a status information for all trace flags currently turned on, you can use -1 for trace#.

This is the example:

DBCC TRACESTATUS(-1)

You can use DBCC TRACEON command to turn on the specified trace flag. This is the syntax from SQL Server Books Online:

DBCC TRACEON (trace# [,...n])

If you want to turn off the specified trace flag(s), you can use DBCC TRACEOFF command. This is the syntax from SQL Server Books Online:

DBCC TRACEOFF (trace# [,...n])

1. Trace flag -1 (undocumented).

This trace flag sets trace flags for all client connections, rather than for a single client connection. Is used only when setting trace flags using DBCC TRACEON and DBCC TRACEOFF. The setting of the Trace flag -1 is not visible with DBCC TRACESTATUS command, but work without problems.

This trace flag was documented in SQL Server 6.5 Books Online, but not documented in SQL Server 7.0 and SQL Server 2000.

2. Trace flag 1204 (undocumented).

This trace flag returns the type of locks participating in the deadlock and the current command affected. This trace flag was documented in SQL Server 7.0 Books Online, but not documented in SQL Server 2000.

3. Trace flag 1205 (undocumented).

This trace flag returns more detailed information about the command being executed at the time of a deadlock.

This trace flag was documented in SQL Server 7.0 Books Online, but not documented in SQL Server 2000.

4. Trace flag 1807 (undocumented).

You cannot create a database file on a mapped or UNC network location. This opportunity is generally unsupported under SQL Server 7.0 and SQL Server 2000.

You can bypass this by turn on trace flag 1807.

Look here for more details: INF: Support for Network Database Files

5. Trace flag 3604 (undocumented).

One of the most used trace flag. Trace flag 3604 sends trace output to the client. This trace flag is used only when setting trace flags with DBCC TRACEON and DBCC TRACEOFF.

Trace flag 3604 was documented in SQL Server 6.5 Books Online and in SQL Server 7.0 Books Online, but not documented in SQL Server 2000.

6. Trace flag 3605 (undocumented).

In comparison with Trace flag 3604, this trace flag sends trace output to the error log.

Trace flag 3605 was documented in SQL Server 6.5 Books Online and in SQL Server 7.0 Books Online, but not documented in SQL Server 2000.

7. Trace flag 3608 (undocumented).

This trace flag skips automatic recovery (at startup) for all databases except the master database.

Trace flag 3608 was documented in SQL Server 6.5 Books Online, but not documented in SQL Server 7.0 and SQL Server 2000.

8. Trace flag 4022.

If turns on, then automatically started procedures will be bypassed. This trace flag described in CREATE PROCEDURE statement in the SQL Server Books Online.

9. Trace flag 8202 (undocumented).

This trace flag used to replicate UPDATE as DELETE/INSERT pair. Let me to describe.

UPDATE commands at the publisher can be run as an "on-page DELETE/INSERT" or a "full DELETE/INSERT".

If the UPDATE command is run as an "on-page DELETE/INSERT," the Logreader send UDPATE command to the subscriber, If the UPDATE command is run as a "full DELETE/INSERT," the Logreader send UPDATE as DELETE/INSERT Pair.

If you turn on trace flag 8202, then UPDATE commands at the publisher will be always send to the subscriber as DELETE/INSERT pair.

See these articles for more information about kinds of update: Update Methods Used in MS SQL 6.5
Update Methods Used in MS SQL 7.0


Literature

1. SQL Server Books Online

2. SQL Server 6.5: Some useful trace flags
http://www.swynk.com/friends/achigrik/TraceFlags65.asp

3. SQL Server 7.0: Some useful trace flags
http://www.swynk.com/friends/achigrik/TraceFlags70.asp

4. INF: Trace Flag to Replicate UPDATE as DELETE/INSERT Pair
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q160/1/81.asp

5. INF: Support for Network Database Files
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q196/9/04.ASP



» See All Articles by Columnist Alexander Chigrik




MS SQL Archives

Comment and Contribute

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have characters left.

 

 




Latest Forum Threads
MS SQL Forum
Topic By Replies Updated
SQL 2005: SSIS: Error using SQL Server credentials poverty 3 August 17th, 07:43 AM
Need help changing table contents nkawtg 1 August 17th, 03:02 AM
SQL Server Memory confifuration bhosalenarayan 2 August 14th, 05:33 AM
SQL Server Primary Key and a Unique Key katty.jonh 2 July 25th, 10:36 AM


















Thanks for your registration, follow us on our social networks to keep up-to-date